Friday, April 15, 2011

Timeline Update

Unfortunately this is the largest number of names we will have for a few hundred years until the Arabs make their contributions. It all goes down hill from here for a number of reasons

Hippasus of Metapontum (or of Sybaris or Croton) (c. 400?) 
Archytas of Tarentum (of Taras) (c. 428-c. 347) 
Plato (427-347)
Theaetetus of Athens (c. 415-c. 369) 
Leodamas of Thasos (fl. c. 380) 
Leon (fl. c. 375) 
Eudoxus of Cnidos (c. 400-c. 347)
Callipus of Cyzicus (fl. c. 370) 
Xenocrates of Chalcedon (c. 396-314) 
Heraclides of Pontus (c. 390-c. 322) 
Bryson of Heraclea (c 350?) 
Menaechmus (c. 350) 
Theudius of Magnesia (c. 350?) 
Thymaridas (c. 350) 
Dinostratus (fl. c. 350) 
Speusippus (d. 339)
Aristotle (384-322) 
Aristaeus the Elder (fl. c. 350-330) 
Eudemus of Rhodes (the Peripatetic) (fl. c. 335) 

17 comments:

  1. I am assuming these are mathematicians? I recognize about 1/4 of these names but it always good to learn some more.

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  2. I need to read your blog more to pick up on my math skills :P

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  3. Your knowledge of history is impecable

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  4. That is absolutely incredible. All of the fundamentals of early mathematics are truly mind blowing.

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  5. All this talk about maths is giving me flashbacks of my chem eng masters before I switched to medicine haha.

    Very interesting though, I like how you're talking about other things like the history of maths.

    Following :)

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  6. I've never heard of any of these, then again, I did fail maths.

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  7. I'm new to this blog... what am I looking at here?

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  8. Reading math at high level at school. This helped a lot! Thanks!

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  9. only know plato...
    shame over me...

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  10. But they weren't in our world today. Today's different.

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  11. why does it go downhill? xplain please.

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